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Novel voting and Leftover Hugo nominated novels post

There are three novel nominees that I started and could not finish. I actually read so little of them that they do not call for an individual post per nominee.

I started off with the novel by Larry Correia. Since Warbound is the concluding part of a trilogy I thought I’d start with the first part of the trilogy, Spellbound. (The Hugo voter packet contains the whole trilogy. That’s awesome, Baen!)

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Opinion: Ann Leckie – Ancillary Justice (2013)

Leckie_AncillaryJusticepublisher: Orbit

length: 416 pages (paperback edition)

obtained: bought e-book at amazon

my rating: 5/5

This is not really a review, although I will try my best. I read this book about half a year ago, so probably the best approximation of a review I can give is my opinion on the book/ reading experience with the book. (But then, aren’t all my reviews just my opinion? Hm.)

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Review: Neptune’s Brood – Charles Stross (2013)

Neptune's Broodpublisher: Orbit

length: 352 pages (in paperback edition)

obtained: bought ebook at amazon

my rating: 4.5/5

Neptune’s Brood is set in the same Universe as Saturn’s Children. For this reason I was reluctant to pick up Neptune’s Brood: I thought it was the second part of a series. Only when I read other Hugo nom reviews did I realize that even though it’s set in the same Universe as Saturn’s Children it is not a continuation of Saturn’s Children. (I had no intention of reading Saturn’s Children. Reason: It has a talking cat character! Ever since that holiday with nothing else to read, but my aunt’s talking cat murder mysteries by – I think – Rita Mae Brown, I have been avoiding this type of books like The Plague.) Now, after having read and thoroughly enjoyed Neptune’s Brood, I might give Saturn’s Children a try – despite the cat.

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New (library) books

When Orbit announced that it would only include extended excerpts of its Hugo nominated novels in this year’s voter packet, I checked other options for getting hold of the books.

My local public library didn’t have any. I wasn’t surprised about this. I live in Germany and, even though the public library has an English book section, this section is very, very small. There’s no SF in there, only mainstream bestsellers, some murder mysteries, a little bit of romance, a few classics and very popular works of fantasy (Tolkien, Rowling, Pratchett).

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Hugo voting part 4: Campbell Award voting

This is a difficult category to vote on. There are two placements on my ballot that I am not sure about. Firstly, I am not sure whether to put Benjanun Sriduangkaew or Max Gladstone in first place. I like the work of both very much and they are just not comparable. How do you fairly compare a short fiction writer to a novelist? I have no idea how. Right now, I am putting Max Gladstone in first place. (I threw a coin…) If I have the time to read more by both authors before voting closes I might have enough data to make a real decision. Let’s hope, I find the time.

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Campbell Nominee: Ramez Naam (Nexus Review)

nexus-75-dpiI haven’t picked up Nexus in almost a week, so I am giving up on it now. I’m about 60% through and it just doesn’t work for me. There are lots (and lots and lots) of things in the novel that make me cringe and shake my head in disbelief. There’s a very good review over at Strange Horizons which nicely puts many things I found wrong with this novel into words, much better than I could ever do it. I’ll try to write a review, anyways. Just to get my thoughts together.

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Hugo Nominated Novella: Six-Gun Snow White – Catherynne M. Valente

Six-Gun Snow White is a wild western retelling of the classic fairy tale Snow White. I never actually read Snow White (or Schneewittchen, which is the tale’s German name that I will always associate with it). I had it read to me by my mother as a bed time story. Probably several times. She used to read fairy tales to me from a big tome of a Grimms M√§rchen hardcover book that had the evil wolf from Rotk√§ppchen (red riding hood?) on the dust jacket.

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